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Chinese International Students’ Stressors in the United States

This chapter mainly examines what the most stressful aspects of Chinese students’ personal, social, and academic lives in the United States are, how they characterize their stress, and what conditions they believe tend to account for their stress. The interview results are reported according to themes that emerged during data analysis. Excerpts of respondents’ statements are used to illustrate the results.

Interview Results

Settings of the Study

The interviews were conducted with Chinese international students who attended a large, public university, in the southwestern United States, with a Chinese international student enrollment of approximately 1500, representing almost 3% of the total enrollment. Graduate students represent 90% of Chinese international students, undergraduates represent 9% of Chinese international students, and 1% of Chinese international students are engaged in other nondegree programs. The Chinese international student population is approximately three-fourths male and one-fourth female.

Nineteen Chinese international students participated in this study. The participants attended a large, public university, in the southwestern United States, with a Chinese international student enrollment of approximately 1500, representing almost 3% of the total enrollment. The interviewees were master’s or doctoral students in liberal arts, applied science, engineering, social science, business, and education. There were ten females and eight males in this study. Their ages ranged from 22 to 38, and their length of residence in the United States ranged from 2 to 8 years. Thirteen were not married at the time of being interviewed; the six married respondents resided with their spouses.

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017 55

K. Yan, Chinese International Students’ Stressors and Coping Strategies in the United States, Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects 37,

DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-3347-6_6

 
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