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Functionalisation, identification and appraisement

Table 2.6 shows that the Chinese actors are categorised the most frequently (at 55%), followed by the Indian participant at 10%, and Asia at 5%. The

Table 2.6 Functionalisation/identification/appraisement in frequency and percentage (Time)

Represen tational category: functionalisation vi identification v.v appraisement

Social actors

Chinese

Non-Chinese

China

US

UK

India

West

Africa

S.

Korea

N.

Korea

Asia

1 Functionalisation

No.

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

%

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2 Identification

No.

2

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

%

10

0

0

5

0

0

0

0

0

3 Appraisement

No.

8

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

%

40

0

0

5

0

0

0

0

5

United States, Africa, South Korea, North Korea, the West, and the UK, however, are represented at a frequency of 0%. In the representational category of categorisation, the Chinese participants are appraised most notably (40%) compared to the process of identification (10%) and functionalisation (5%). The appraisement of the Chinese actors is eight-fold greater than that of India and Asia, at 5% each. Here are examples of the appraisement of the Chinese actors, particularly in issues relating to growth model, international trade and currency and workers’ rights.

  • 1. Economy and policy: Will China’s economy collapse? A2C
  • 2. China: A new economic model? A3C
  • 3. Economy and policy: Is the Chinese yuan too cheap? A5C
  • 4. As China economy grows, so does labor unrest A8C
  • 5. Wall street and markets: Is China a debt junkie? A9C
  • 6. Does China need a second stimulus? A10C
  • 7. Economy and policy: The real victims of China’s yuan policy A12C
  • 8. Economy and policy: India vs China: Which is the best role A16C

model for the developing world?

In the growth model topic, the use of the evaluative verb ‘collapse’ (versus the antonym ‘rise’ or ‘success’) in A2C and the evaluative adjective ‘new’ (as opposed to ‘old’) in A3C cast doubt on the viability and sustainability of China’s economic growth model, which is further depicted as overly reliant on debt through the evaluative noun ‘debt’ in the compound noun ‘debt junkie’ (A9C) and also requiring further fiscal stimulus to encourage economic growth through the adjective ‘second’ (in contrast with ‘first’) in A10C. Last, A16C utilises the interrogative pronoun ‘which’ to elicit a response from the readers, who have to compare China’s and India’s development model and choose the most suitable one - by means of the evaluative adjective ‘best’ (as opposed to ‘worst’) - for the other emerging economies to follow.

It is to be highlighted that all the headlines (A2C, АЗС, A9C, A10C, and A16C) relating to growth model are framed as questions, which has the effect of garnering attention, interest, and curiosity, therefore inducing certain types of behaviour in the reader. As Moore, Neal, Fitzsimons, and Shiv (2012) explain, the power of question headlines is rooted in their ability to initiate cognitive processes associated with recall, accessibility, and elaboration of information.

In the international trade and currency topic, the value of the Chinese yuan is represented as being undervalued through the evaluative adverb ‘too’ and adjective ‘cheap’ (A5C), and having the effect of causing harm through the assessable noun ‘victim’ denoted in A12C. The plight of the workers is also put at the forefront with the aid of the conjunction ‘as’ and the evaluative noun ‘unrest’, which conjures up an image of a growing number of public demonstrations led by dissatisfied workers despite China’s growing economy. The functionalisation of the Chinese actor is realised from the construction between the noun ‘junk’ and the suffix ‘-ie’, i.e. junkie (A9C).

Table2.7 Association/dissociation in frequency and percentage (Time)

Re presen tational category: association vi dissociation

Social actors

Chinese

Non-Chinese

China

US

UK

India

West

Africa

5.

Korea

N.

Korea

Asia

1 Association

No.

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

%

5

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2 Dissociation

No.

3

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

%

15

10

0

5

0

0

0

0

0

 
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