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Note

1. There has been critique over the use of the term maker as an emasculating term that privileges white, male, able-bodied creators versus their counterparts. Art professor Diane Willow at the University of Minnesota has shared with me a story wherein a female colleague who invented the technology for the LilyPad e-textile circuit board was only ever noted as a “crafter” in mainstream reports rather than a “maker” due to her identification as female. For the purpose of clarity and consistency, I use “maker” as an androgynous term to represent all creators who embody the spirit of the Maker Movement.

References

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