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Contributor bios

Peter Afflerbach is Professor of Education at the University of Maryland. Dr. Affler-bach’s research interests focus on individual differences in reading, reading comprehension strategies for print and digital reading, reading assessment, and the verbal reporting methodology. He serves on the Reading Committee of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and was elected to the International Literacy Associations Reading Hall of Fame in 2009. He is the editor of the Handbook of Individual Differences in Reading: Reader, Text, and Context (2016), and co-editor of the Handbook of Reading Research, 4th Edition (2010) and 5th Edition (in press).

Silza Ahumada received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Hispanic language and literature, majoring in Spanish linguistics, from Universidad de Chile. Currently, she is a Ph.D. candidate at the Education and Society doctoral program, Universidad Andres Bello, Chile. Her doctoral research studies the implementation of evidence-based practices for writing instruction in elementary school teachers and how the adoption of these practices is related to personal, classroom, and institutional factors.

Patricia A. Alexander is a Distinguished University Professor, the Jean Mullan Professor of Literacy, and Distinguished Scholar-Teacher in the Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology at the University of Maryland. The author of over 300 articles, books, chapters, and monographs, her research focuses on textbased learning, strategic processing, knowledge, and interest. Her Model of Domain Learning (1997, 2003, 2018) considers the interaction of these factors in students’ academic development. She currently serves as the senior editor of Contemporary Educational Psychology and is the Educational Psychology Handbook series editor for Routledge.

Prisila Alvarez received a Masters in Reading Comprehension and Written Production from School of Education and Social Sciences, Andres Bello University, Chile. She currently works as a teacher of basic education in public schools in Chile, where she teaches reading, writing, and speaking strategies to children.

Martine Baars is an educational psychologist and her research concerns improving self-regulated learning in primary, secondary, and higher education. She focuses on several aspects of self-regulated learning such as self-monitoring accuracy, motivation, learning strategies, and cognitive load during learning in both offline and online learning environments (e.g., MOOCs) for individuals and groups. As a Researcher Martine is active in the Centre for Education and Learning (CEL) of the Strategic Alliance of Leiden University, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) and Erasmus University Rotterdam, as well as in the Community of Learning and Innovation (CLI) at the Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Janelle M. Bailey is a faculty member in the Department of Teaching and Learning at Temple University, where she focuses on astronomy and Earth science teaching and learning as well as science teacher education. She is a Past President of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) and serves as a reviewer for several research and practitioner journals. Janelle earned her Ph.D. in Teaching & Teacher Education (minor in Astronomy) with a focus on astronomy education from the University of Arizona; an M.Ed. in Science Education from the University of Georgia; and a B.A. in Astrophysics from Agnes Scott College.

Gerardo Banales holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from University Ramon Hull, Spain. He is currently an Associate Professor at the School of Education and Social Sciences, Andres Bello University, Chile. He teaches courses in theory and teaching of writing in masters and doctorate programs. Among his publications is Teach to Read and Write in Higher Education: Educational proposals based on research. His current lines of research are related to teacher professional development and the strategic teaching of narrative, expository, and argumentative writing in primary and higher education contexts.

Ivar Braten is a Professor of Educational Psychology in the Department of Education at the University of Oslo, Norway. His main research interests are epistemic cognition, self-regulated learning, reading comprehension, and multiple document literacy. He is widely published, with international research articles, book chapters, and books in his areas of specialization. He currently serves on six editorial review boards.

Deborah L. Butler is a Professor in the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia. Previous roles include Director for the Centre of Cross-Faculty Inquiry, Associate Dean for Graduate Programs and Research, Associate Dean for Strategic Development, and Senior Associate Dean. She is past Co-President of the Canadian Association for Educational Psychology (2012-2014). In her collaborative research with educators, she has studied how to support academic success by students within inclusive classrooms, and how why supporting self-regulated learning (SRL) is so key to empowering learners, and how educators can work together to construct practices that achieve positive outcomes.

Jacqueline M. Campbell received her Bachelors degree in Chemistry from Shippensburg University and her Masters degree in Educational Psychology from

The Pennsylvania State University. Currently, she is a Ph.D. candidate in Educational Psychology at The Pennsylvania State University. Her research addresses problemsolving issues in undergraduate STEM courses and specifically focuses on developing interventions to improve students’ ability to learn from worked examples and use effective learning strategies.

Kelly B. Cartwright is Professor of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Teacher Preparation at Christopher Newport University (CNU) where she directs the Reading, Executive function, And Development Lab (READ Lab). Her research explores the development of skilled reading comprehension and the neurocognitive and affective factors that underlie comprehension processes and difficulties from preschool through adulthood. Her work has appeared in Journal of Educational Psychology, Contemporary Educational Psychology, Research in Developmental Disabilities, and a range of other publications. She regularly works with teachers in public and private schools to understand and improve reading comprehension for struggling readers, and these experiences inform her research.

Leen Catrysse (Ph.D.) is a postdoctoral Researcher and Guest Professor at the Department of Training and Education Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Antwerp, Belgium. The focus of her research is on how to measure higher education students’ processing strategies and learning in general with eye-tracking in combination with other online and biometric measures.

Byeong-Young Cho (Ph.D.) is an Associate Professor of Language, Literacy and Culture in the School of Education, University of Pittsburgh, and a research scientist at Pitt’s Learning Research & Development Center. His research focuses on understanding cognitive, metacognitive, and epistemic dimensions of reading and learning in a complex task environment. His recent work examines classroom practices that support student learning and engagement through accessing, processing, and using multiple texts in disciplinary and digital literacies instruction.

Jennifer G. Cromley is Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She does basic and applied research in comprehension of illustrated scientific text, as well as research on achievement and retention of undergraduate students in STEM. She has used a wide variety of parametric and nonparametric statistics in her research on outcomes of learning, predictors of learning, and the processes that happen during learning. She has taught graduate statistics for 14 years, ranging from introductory to advanced educational statistics.

Liesje De Backer is a postdoctoral Researcher at the Department of Educational Studies at Ghent University, Belgium. She obtained her Ph.D. in 2015. The main focus of her current research activities is on fostering socially shared regulation processes in face-to-face and computer-supported collaborative learning in higher education, as well as on investigating the relation between collaborative learners’ shared regulation behavior and their performance.

Anique de Bruin is an Educational Psychologist and Professor in Self-regulation in Higher Education. Her research aims at understanding how students and professionals monitor and regulate their learning when studying texts, during problem solving, and during clinical reasoning, and how these processes can be supported through effective instructional design.

Susan De La Paz is a Professor in the Department of Counseling, Higher Education, and Special Education at the University of Maryland. Her research spans learning to write and writing to learn - and is driven by the need for effective instruction to facilitate students’ planning, translating, and revising skills, as well as to support their use of writing to develop epistemic and disciplinary understanding in academic subjects. She is a co-author of Reading, Thinking, and Writing about History: Teaching argument writing to diverse learners in the common core classroom, grades 6-12.

Fien De Smedt obtained her Ph.D. in 2019 and currently works as a postdoctoral Researcher at the Department of Educational Studies at Ghent University, Belgium. Her research focuses on studying cognitive and motivational challenges in writing and on how to overcome these challenges. In this respect, she investigates the effectiveness of explicit writing instruction and peer-assisted writing in elementary and secondary education.

Daniel L. Dinsmore is an Associate Professor and Research Director of the Northeast Florida Center for STEM Education (NEFSTEM) at the University of North Florida. His research mainly encompasses strategy use and strategic processing in multiple academic domains and how this leads to expertise in those domains.

Vincent Donche (Ph.D.) is a Professor at the Department of Training and Education Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Antwerp, Belgium. He conducts research in the domains of learning and instruction, higher education, and educational measurement.

Denis Dumas is an Assistant Professor of Research Methods and Statistics at the University of Denvers Morgridge College of Education. In general, his work focuses on understanding student learning, cognition, and creativity through the application and refinement of latent variable methods. He is widely interested in the mental attributes that contribute to students’ academic success across domains and contexts, and has recently been specifically researching the way in which expertise development influences students’ strategic processing both individually and in groups.

Rebekah Freed is a doctoral student in the Learning Sciences and Psychological Studies Ph.D. program in the School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has an M.A. in Educational Psychology and a B.A. in Psychology. She previously taught Human Development and Psychology courses at Westminster College and Utah Valley University. She also worked as a research assistant studying social development at the University of Utah. Her current research interests include ways of fostering volition and goal pursuit during self-regulated learning.

Luke K. Fryer is an Associate Professor and Assistant Director (Programmes, CETL) within the Faculty of Education at The University of Hong Kong. He is a Researcher in multiple areas of inquiry, from online learning and teaching to learning strategies in higher education, and, more recently, the development of interest during education.

David Gijbels is Full Professor of Learning and Instruction at the Department of Training and Education Sciences in the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Antwerp, Belgium. His research is situated in the research group Edubron and focuses on learning and assessment in (higher) education and in the workplace.

Steve Graham is the Warner Professor of Educational Leadership and Innovation at Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. He is also a Research Professor at the Institute for Learning Sciences and Teacher Education at Australian Catholic University at Brisbane. He is the current editor of Journal of Educational Psychology. He is interested in all aspects of writing, including strategy instruction.

Jeffrey A. Greene is a Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology and an M.A. in Educational Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation. He was awarded the 2016 Richard E. Snow Award for Distinguished Early Contributions in Educational Psychology from Division 15 of the American Psychological Association. Greene’s research focuses upon digital literacy, including student cognition, self-regulation, and epistemic cognition in science and history domains.

Karen R. Harris is the Warner Professor of Educational Leadership and Innovation at Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. She is also a Research Professor at the Institute for Learning Sciences and Teacher Education at Australian Catholic University at Brisbane. She is the former editor of Journal of Educational Psychology. Her research interest focuses on self-regulation and strategy instruction. She is the developer of the Self-Regulated Strategy Development Model, which has been used widely in writing.

Courtney Hattan is an Assistant Professor of Elementary Literacy Education in the School of Teaching and Learning at Illinois State University. She earned her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of Maryland and her M.S.Ed. with a focus in reading from Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Hattan has worked as an elementary and middle school Language Arts and Social Studies teacher in Baltimore city and rural North Carolina. Her program of research centers on the interplay between readers’ knowledge and what they understand and remember from text.

Matthew Hurt began his work in education as a 3rd grade teacher in Oklahoma City after finishing his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Public Relations at Virginia Tech. Later, he moved to Nashville to pursue a master’s degree in Education Policy at Vanderbilt University. While in Tennessee, he worked for Metro Nashville Public

Schools and then with the Tennessee Department of Education. Matthew is currently a doctoral student at the University of Maryland in the Teaching and Learning, Policy and Leadership Department.

Susan Lutz Klauda is a Faculty Specialist at the University of Maryland and an Adjunct Professor at The Catholic University of America. Her research has centered on the interplay of cognitive, affective, and social dimensions in reading skill development and on the characteristics of effective reading interventions for children and adolescents. Currently, she is focusing on reading comprehension and motivation in elementary school-aged dual language learners. Her work has appeared in such journals as Reading Research Quarterly, Journal of Educational Psychology, and Educational Psychology Review.

Kimberly A. Lawless is the Dean of the College of Education at The Pennsylvania State University. Her research focuses on the meaningful integration of technology in support of interdisciplinary learning and problem solving.

Alexandra List is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, Counseling, and Special Education at The Pennsylvania State University. Her work examines how students learn from multiple texts, such as when researching information on the Internet. Her work has appeared in leading educational psychology journals, including Educational Psychologist, Learning and Instruction, and Computers in Human Behavior. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Learning and Instruction and Program Evaluation. Alexandra earned her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology and M.A. in Educational Measurement and Statistics from the Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methods at the University of Maryland.

Doug Lombardi is an Associate Professor, Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland. As the Head of the Science Learning Research Group, he conducts research focusing on developing tools to facilitate students’ reasoning about socio-scientific topics (i.e., those that pose local, regional, and global challenges, such as climate change). Doug received early career research awards from the American Educational Research Associations Division C, American Psychological Associations Division 15, and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning Through Research.

Sofie Loyens is a Full Professor of Excellence in Education at University College Roosevelt (UCR), one of Utrecht University’s liberal arts and sciences colleges. Her Chair of Excellence in Education is the first (and only) of its kind in the Netherlands. She is also appointed as an Associate Professor in Educational Psychology at Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR). She is currently an associate editor of Contemporary Educational Psychology and serves on various editorial boards. Her research focuses on problem-based learning (or more broadly student-centered/constructivist learning environments), motivation from a Self-Determination Theory perspective, and self-regulated/self-directed learning.

Joseph P. Magliano received his Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of Memphis in 1992. He is a Professor of Educational Psychology in the Department of Learning Sciences at Georgia State University His research focuses on the cognitive mechanisms that support the comprehension of different media (texts, films, comics). He has an interest in understanding why some college students struggle with their academic reading activities, developing ways to assess why they struggle, and interventions to support them. He has published extensively on these topics and received external funding to support this research.

Emmelien Merchie is a postdoctoral Researcher and Lecturer at the Department of Educational Studies at Ghent University, Belgium. She obtained her Ph.D. in 2014. Her research activities focus on measuring and stimulating reading comprehension and learning from text in elementary and secondary education. She also investigates the effectiveness of mind maps in text comprehension and learning.

Pamela Munoz holds a Master’s in Reading Comprehension and Written Production from the School of Education and Social Sciences, Andres Bello University, Chile. She currently works as a teacher of basic education in private schools in Chile, where she teaches reading, writing, and speaking strategies to children.

Kristie Newton has taught both middle and high school mathematics as well as conducted professional development for mathematics teachers at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Her research has focused on the development of mathematical knowledge, especially related to fractions and algebra. She has explored mathematical thinking across a range of groups, from struggling learners to experts, in order to understand misconceptions as well as productive and flexible ways of problem solving. She is also interested in how this knowledge is related to other significant factors, such as motivation and instruction.

Jeffery D. Nokes is an Associate Professor in the History Department at Brigham Young University. He earned a Ph.D. in teaching and learning from the University of Utah. A former middle school and high school teacher, he researches history teaching and learning, historical literacy, and preparing young people for civic engagement. His scholarship has appeared in several important journals. He is the author of Building Students’ Historical Literacies: Learning to read and reason with historical texts and evidence and Teaching History, Learning Citizenship: Tools for civic engagement. Jeffery has received middle school, high school, and university teaching awards.

Fred Paas is Professor of Educational Psychology at Erasmus University Rotterdam in the Netherlands, and Professorial Fellow at the University of Wollongong, Australia. Since 1990 he has been investigating the instructional control of cognitive load in the training of complex cognitive tasks. In 2016 he was recognized as the worlds most productive author in the five best journals in the field of educational psychology for the period 2009-2014. He is editor-in-chief of the journal Educational Psychology Review, and editorial board member of the Journal of Educational Psychology. He is a fellow of the American Educational Research Association.

Meghan M. Parkinson is the College of Education and Human Services Director of Assessment and Accreditation. She also teaches educational psychology. Meghan was previously an Early Childhood Specialist for the Jacksonville Public Library and an ESOL teacher for Catholic Charities Refugee Resettlement Program. Her research interests include literacy and vocabulary development, metacognitive processes, and preservice teachers’ beliefs about the nature of knowledge and learning (epistemic beliefs).

Robert D. Plumley is a doctoral student in the Ph.D. in Education (Learning Sciences & Psychological Studies) program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has also earned an M.S. in Computer Science from Pace University and a B.S. in Business Administration from North Carolina State University. His research focuses on the use of technology-enhanced learning environments and learning analytics methodologies to identify and encourage students’ engagement in self-regulated learning strategies.

Jeremy Riel is an Educational Technologist at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Education. He researches the applicability of emerging technologies for educational uses, designs for online and distance education, and learning analytics.

Amelie Rogiers obtained her doctoral degree in Educational Studies at Ghent University, Belgium, in 2019 after completing her teacher training and obtaining her Master’s degree. Her doctoral research focuses on measuring and fostering secondary school students’ strategies for learning text. Currently, Amélie is still working as a Researcher at the Department of Educational Studies.

Ladislao Salmeron obtained his Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology at the University of Granada, Spain. During the academic year 2004-2005 he was a Fulbright visiting scholar at the Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology at the University of Valencia, Spain. His research focuses on the assessment of digital literacies and their promotion in different populations.

Leyton Schnellert is an Associate Professor in UBC’s Department of Curriculum & Pedagogy. His scholarship attends to how teachers and teaching and learners and learning can embrace student diversity and inclusive education. Dr. Schnellert is the Pedagogy and Participation Research Cluster Lead in UBC’s Institute for Community Engaged Research. His community-based collaborative work contributes a counterargument to top-down approaches that operate from deficit models, instead drawing from communities’ funds of knowledge to build participatory and culturally responsive practices. His books, films, and research articles are widely referenced in local, national, and international contexts.

Alex Shum is a Lecturer within the Faculty of Science at The University of Hong Kong. He is also currently a Ph.D. candidate undertaking research in formative testing, feedback, and self-efficacy development.

Ana Taboada Barber’s work centers on studying the influence of specific cognitive, linguistic, and motivation variables on the literacy and language development students of diverse language backgrounds. As a former English as a Second Language teacher, Ana’s work in reading comprehension development is principally concentrated within the population of Dual Language Learners (DLLs) or emergent bilinguals within the United States. More recently, Ana has extended her focus to include Spanish-speaking students in South America. Her work has been published in Journal of Educational Psychology, Reading Psychology, Journal of Experimental Education, Literacy Research and Instruction, and Reading Research Quarterly, among others.

Hilde Van Keer received her Ph.D. in 2002 and is currently Professor at the Department of Educational Studies at Ghent University, Belgium. Her main research interests include peer learning, measuring and fostering self-regulated learning, and learning and instruction in reading and writing. In these research lines, intervention research in authentic learning environments and close partnership with primary and secondary schools is at the core of the studies.

Peggy Van Meter received her Master’s degree in Psychology from Wake Forest University and her doctoral degree, with a specialization in Educational Psychology, from the University of Maryland, College Park. Currently, she is an Associate Professor in the Educational Psychology program at The Pennsylvania State University. Her research addresses college student learning with multiple representations that include both verbal and visual representations. She has conducted a number of studies across different science and engineering courses testing interventions to support student learning from these representations.

Jan D. Vermunt is a Professor of Learning and Educational Innovation at Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven School of Education, The Netherlands. He is also Scientific Director of the School. From 2012 to 2018 he was a Professor of Education at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Wolfson College. He served as Editor-in-Chief of Learning and Instruction, one of the leading journals in the world in the field of Educational Research, from 2014 to 2018. His research interests focus on teaching and student learning in higher education, and teachers’ learning and professional development.

Lisette Wijnia is a Professor of Applied Sciences at HZ University of Applied Sciences in Vlissingen, The Netherlands and Senior Lecturer at Erasmus University College of Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands. She obtained her Ph.D. in 2014. In her Ph.D. thesis she investigated students’ motivation and achievement in problem-based learning, for which she received a best dissertation award from Stichting Praemium Erasmianum. Her current research focuses on students’ motivation and self-regulated learning in secondary and higher education and the effectiveness of student-centered, collaborative learning methods such as problembased learning. She is an editorial board member of Contemporary Educational Psychology.

Philip H. Winne (Ph.D., Stanford) is Professor at Simon Fraser University and formerly a 2-term Tier I Canada Research Chair. He researches self-regulated learning, metacognition, and learning analytics; and develops software technologies to support learners and gather big data for learning science. He has published more than 185 scholarly books, articles, chapters, and proceedings. Honors include the Robbie Case Memorial Award, Barry J. Zimmerman Award, and Canadian Society for the Study of Education Mentorship Award. He is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, Association for Psychological Science, Canadian Psychological Association, and Royal Society of Canada.

Lindsay Woodward (Ph.D.) is an Assistant Professor in the School of Education at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa. Her research focuses on understanding how teachers and students utilize digital texts and tools for literacy learning. Her recent work has appeared in journals such as the American Educational Research Journal, Reading Research Quarterly, and Teachers College Record.

 
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