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COURTS AND JUVENILES

Juvenile cases with a few exceptions are dealt with by family courts. As mentioned earlier, no penalties provided for adults could be imposed on juvenile lawbreakers by family courts. The JA in the current wording[1] enables the family court to impose a penalty exclusively in the course of enforcement proceedings if the juvenile at first was given the disposition of the placement in a correctional institution but he completed 18 years before this judgment started to be enforced and the execution of the correctional measure would be inadvisable in the opinion of the court.[2] In practice, the latter possibility has been used by family courts extremely rarely. In cases concerning 15- and 16-year-old juveniles suspected of most serious crimes, the family court can transfer the case to the public prosecutor in order to bring an accusation to the common criminal court. Juvenile offenders exceptionally tried in common criminal courts may receive penalties provided for adults. The proceedings in such cases are criminal proceedings and sanctions imposed in these proceedings are not included in statistics on family court dispositions in juvenile cases.

Formal judgments issued by the family court in juvenile cases include the imposition of educational, medical, or correctional measures. According to the JA, all educational and medical measures may be applied both to juveniles who have committed ‘punishable acts’ while between 13 and 16 years of age and to juveniles less than 18 years of age displaying problematic behaviors (‘signs of demoralization’). Correctional measures, this is suspended or unsuspended placement of a juvenile in a correctional institution, may be imposed only on juveniles who have committed ‘punishable acts’ prohibited by the criminal law as offenses or fiscal offenses after the 13th birthday, but prior to the 17th.

While choosing between different measures the family court should take into account the interest of the juvenile concerned, the need to achieve positive changes in his personality and behavior, as well as the need to encourage and support proper fulfillment of duties by the juvenile’s parents or guardians. With regard to correctional measures, some additional factors should be pointed out, such as a high degree of the perpetrator’s negative antisocial attitudes and behaviors, the circumstances and the nature of the act committed, as well as ineffectiveness of educational measures which have proved unsuccessful in resocializing offenders. The JA does not require the establishment of the culpability of the juvenile in the meaning of his ability to act with discernment at the time of the ‘punishable act,’ because the legislator considers this to be irrelevant for the choice of the most adequate measure. It also does not provide the principle of proportionality in reactions to the seriousness of the ‘punishable act.’

The catalog of educational measures has changed since 1982 to a limited extent. Currently, Article 6 of the JA enumerates the following educational measures:

  • (a) A reprimand
  • (b) Supervision by parents, a guardian, a youth or other social organization, a workplace, a trustworthy person, or a probation officer
  • (c) Applying special conditions, such as redressing the damage, making an apology to the victim, performing unpaid work for the benefit of the victim or local community, taking up school education or a job, taking part in educational or therapeutic training, avoiding specific locations, refraining from the use of alcohol and other intoxicants
  • (d) A ban on driving
  • (e) Forfeiture of objects gained through the commission of a punishable act
  • (f) Placing a juvenile in a youth probation center in which he spends a couple of hours daily
  • (g) Placing a juvenile in a professional foster family
  • (h) Placing a juvenile in a suitable institution or organization providing education, therapy, or vocational training
  • (i) Placing a juvenile in a residential youth educational center

The vast majority of educational measures do not change the place of residence of the juvenile who stays with his family during the enforcement of imposed measures. Among measures resulting in the change of residence may be the placement of a juvenile in a professional foster family, in an organization or institution functioning as a boarding school as well as in a youth educational center. Medical measures may be applied to juveniles who are suffering from mental deficiency, mental disease, some kind of mental disorder or from alcohol and drug addiction. These measures imply placing juveniles in a psychiatric hospital, other suitable health care institutions, a social welfare institution, or a suitable youth educational center. Both educational and medical measures are applied for an indeterminate period of time. As a rule these measures terminate when a juvenile reaches the age of 18, but in some cases their duration is extended to his 21st birthday. The family court that executes the measures may change, revise, or repeal them at any time if it is advisable for educational reasons.

The most severe measures provided by the JA are correctional measures. They consist of suspended or unsuspended placement of a juvenile in a correctional institution. Similar to other categories of measures, the correctional ones are also applied for an indeterminate period of time. The juvenile placed in a correctional institution can stay there not longer than up to 21 years of age, although he may be granted conditional release earlier.

In practice, family court dispositions in proceedings concerning ‘punishable acts’ impose mainly educational measures (Ministerstwo Sprawiedliwosci

[Ministry of Justice] 2015b). In the period 2004-2014, the total number of juveniles on whom educational, medical, and correctional measures were imposed due to ‘punishable acts’ declined from 28,342 in 2004 to 16,388 in 2014 (Table 17.1). The structure of imposed measures remained relatively stable. The most frequently applied measures were educational measures, including reprimand, supervision by a probation officer, supervision by parents, and applying special conditions. As can be seen from the Table 17.1, in the analyzed period about one in three juveniles on whom measures were imposed due to ‘punishable acts’ received reprimand and also one in three were placed under the supervision of a probation officer. The numbers and percentages of juvenile offenders placed under the supervision of parents were falling while application of special conditions showed an upward trend. Other educational measures that were enumerated in Table 17.1 were imposed on juvenile perpetrators of ‘punishable acts’ significantly rarely, including the placement of a juvenile in a youth educational center. The latter disposition was received by 811 in 2013 and 728 in 2014.

In comparison with educational measures, the medical ones have been used by family courts very rarely. In 2014 there were 78 juveniles adjudicated due to punishable acts who received medical measures, including 16 juveniles placed in a

Table 17.1. Selected educational measures imposed on juvenile offenders in the years 2004-2014

Total number of juveniles on whom measuresa were imposed

Supervision by a probation officer

Supervision by parents

Application of special conditions

Reprimand

N.

%

N

%

N

%

N.

%

2004

28,342

9445

33.3

4930

17.4

3980

14

10,125

35.7

2005

26,228

8508

32.4

4489

17.1

4514

17.2

9257

35.3

2006

27,419

8914

32.5

4604

16.8

5177

18.9

9695

35.4

2007

27,790

8689

31.3

4633

16.7

6052

21.8

10,034

36.1

2008

26,957

8554

31.7

4244

15.7

5882

21.8

9569

35.5

2009

24,953

7910

31.7

3657

14.7

5835

23.4

8581

34.4

2010

22,758

7615

33.5

3323

14.6

5721

25.1

7338

32.2

2011

22,807

7273

31.9

3022

13.3

5914

25.9

7707

33.8

2012

20,980

6559

31.3

2698

12.9

6032

28.8

6972

33.2

2013

19,135

5782

30.2

2328

12.2

5435

28.4

6374

33.3

2014

16,388

4923

30

1738

10.6

4428

27

5686

34.7

Note: Statistical data in this Table show the most frequently applied educational measures. Family courts imposed on juvenile offenders also other educational measures but less frequently

“Data in this column refer to the number of juveniles on whom educational, medical, and correctional measures were imposed and not the number of measures. Educational measures may be combined what means that the family court may impose two or more educational measures on the same juvenile

Source: For the years 2004-2012 Giowny Urz^d Statystyczny (Central Statistical Office). Rocznik Statystyczny Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej (Statistical Yearbook of the Republic of Poland). Warsaw, yearly publication; for the years 2013-2014 Ministerstwo Sprawiedliwosci (Ministry of Justice 2015b). Wydziai Statystycznej Informacji Zarz^dczej Departament Strategii i Funduszy Europejskich. Nieletni wg orzeczonych srodkowprawomocne orzec- zenia w latach 2008-2014. Retrieved from http://isws.ms.gov.pl/pl/baza-statystyczna/opracowania-wieloletnie/

Number of correctional measures imposed on juvenile offenders in the years 2004-2014. Source

Figure 17.3. Number of correctional measures imposed on juvenile offenders in the years 2004-2014. Source: for the years 2004-2012 Glowny Urz^d Statystyczny (Central Statistical Office). Rocznik Statystyczny Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej (Statistical Yearbook of the Republic of Poland). Warsaw, yearly publication; for the years 2013-2014 Ministerstwo Sprawiedliwosci (Ministry of Justice 2015b). Wydzial Statystycznej Informacji Zarz^dczej Departament Strategii i Funduszy Europejskich. Nieletni wg orzeczonych srodkow prawomocne orzeczenia w latach 2008-2014. Retrieved from http:// isws.ms.gov.pl/pl/baza-statystyczna/opracowania-wieloletnie/.

psychiatric hospital and 57 in other health care institutions (Ministerstwo Sprawiedliwosci [Ministry of Justice] 2015b). The same applies to correctional measures, this is the most severe measure provided by the JA for juvenile offenders. Figure 17.3 shows the clear downward trend in the use of correctional measures. In 2004 such measures were imposed on 1322 juveniles, including 781 juveniles who received a suspended correctional measure, and 541 juveniles placed in a correctional institution without suspension. In 2014 there were only 411 dispositions concerning the placement of a juvenile in a correctional institution, most of which (216) referred to a suspended measure.

It may be added that a steady decline in the use of correctional measures has been a long-term tendency in Poland (Stando-Kawecka 2015). Due to the lack of empirical research it is not possible to explain this tendency clearly. It may be assumed that family judges dealing with juvenile offenders are reluctant to place them in correctional institutions because they do not consider it to be in the interest of juveniles. Another possible explanation refers to the assumption that family judges who adjudicate juvenile cases under the civil procedure use cautiously, measures of ‘penal’ origin as is the case with the correctional institution. The latter hypothesis seems to be particularly substantial after the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in the case Adamkiewicz v. Poland. The

Court found the violation of the European Convention of Human Rights because of the lack of procedural safeguards in juvenile proceeding which resulted in the placement of the juvenile concerned in a correctional institution.

  • [1] Before the 2013 amendment to the JA it was also possible for the family court to impose a penaltyprovided for adults on a juvenile perpetrator of a punishable act who at the time of adjudicationcompleted 18 years of age and the family court was of the opinion that the placement in a correctional institution would be inadvisable. In practice, this possibility was used by family courtsextremely rarely.
  • [2] See Article 94 of the 1982 JA.
 
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