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Kuala Lumpur City Centre Integrated Urban Development Zone: A New Art of Urban Living

Nila Keumala and Mastura Adam

Introduction

Kuala Lumpur (KL), the capital and premier city in Malaysia has a total land area of 243.7 km[1] located within the Klang Valley with a total population of 1,556,200 in 2005. Thus, its density reached 6386 persons per km[1]. Planning wise, Kuala Lumpur is divided into six strategic zones under the Kuala Lumpur Structure Plan (2004-2020). The mega city is connected with the surrounding areas by highways such as KESAS, Federal Highway, NPE, ELITE, roads, and railways (Light Rail Transits and KTM Komuter).

Kuala Lumpur City Centre (KLCC) Zone situated within the city centre of Kuala Lumpur is shown in Fig. 1.1. The zone is covering 1, 813 ha and surrounded by major movement network crossing east-west axis as well as north-south axis; several hills such as Bukit Nanas, Bukit Ceylon, Bukit Tunku and the river valleys of Sungai Klang and Sungai Gombak as shown in Fig. 1.2 (Kuala Lumpur City Hall 2008).

KLCC zone is lively and attractive and like any other fast growing city, its population is expected to rise up to 245,600 people in 2020 from 128,721 in 2000. The employment of the City Centre in 2000 was 396,036 and is projected to be about 438,010 by 2020.

The relocation of federal government offices to Putrajaya has further changed the traditional role of the city centre as residential cum commercial in Kuala Lumpur setting into a commercial centre of attraction that could draw people back to the inner city. Apart from the social aspect, the inner city development is to follow the general principle of urban design guide line in terms of controlling the building heights, maintaining the city wide view and defining the visual corridors, this main

Development strategy city centre (Kuala Lumpur Structure Plan 2020)

Fig. 1.1 Development strategy city centre (Kuala Lumpur Structure Plan 2020)

commercial district now has the characteristic that creates an attractive and unique identity of a city to showcase Kuala Lumpur as A World Class City.

In aiming to reduce the Carbon footprint and traffic congestion, City Hall of KL is promoting the use of public transportation, facilitating pedestrian movement and organising the bicycle network around KLCC Zone. In order to improve the overall environmental quality of Kuala Lumpur City Centre zone, the green area is extended into the city centre. The existing community facilities in the city centre have been upgraded and additional community facilities shall be provided for the city residents within a comprehensive mixed-use development.

Kuala Lumpur city-regions and strategic zones (Kuala Lumpur Structure Plan 2020)

Fig. 1.2 Kuala Lumpur city-regions and strategic zones (Kuala Lumpur Structure Plan 2020)

  • [1] N. Keumala (*) • A. Mastura Department of Architecture, Faculty of Built Environment, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia e-mail: This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it ; This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017A. Sayigh (ed.), Sustainable High Rise Buildings in Urban Zones,DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-17756-4_1
  • [2] N. Keumala (*) • A. Mastura Department of Architecture, Faculty of Built Environment, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia e-mail: This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it ; This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017A. Sayigh (ed.), Sustainable High Rise Buildings in Urban Zones,DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-17756-4_1
 
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