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Home arrow Engineering arrow Sustainable High Rise Buildings in Urban Zones: Advantages, Challenges, and Global Case Studies

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Energy in Office Buildings

Office and retail and service buildings consume most of the energy used in buildings because these types of buildings are very common and usually exist in large number and areas. Together, they account for 41 % of all commercial building energy in the US (EIA-CBEC 2003). Office buildings, which have the second largest amount of buildings and floor space in the US, consume most energy of all building types, accounting for 19 % of all commercial energy consumption; i.e., a total of 1.0 quadrillion Btu of combined energy. Lighting accounts for the most use (39 %), followed by space cooling (14 %) and ventilation (9 %) of electricity energy consumption (Btu) by the end use in office buildings in 2003 (Fig. 3.1 and Table 3.1) based on figures by Energy Information Administration, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). Such important information should be realized by designers in order to give priority when solving the energy problem by design strategies related to daylighting and cooling/ventilation

Electricity energy consumption (Btu) by end use in office buildings, 2003

Fig. 3.1 Electricity energy consumption (Btu) by end use in office buildings, 2003

Table 3.1 Electricity energy consumption (Btu) by end use in office buildings

Energy use

Trillion btu

Energy use

Trillion btu

Space heating

33

Cooking

1

Cooling

101

Refrigeration

35

Ventilation

63

Office equipment

32

Water heating

7

Computers

74

Lighting

281

Other

91

Source: Energy Information Administration, 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey

measures, then replace the residual consumption of energy that will always be there with renewables rather than non-renewables.

 
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