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Author Notes

The author thanks Trinity Aodh, Fran Blumberg, Steve Croker, Devin Gill, Robert Hausmann, Carrie Lavis, and Brad Morris for helpful comments and suggestions.

Notes

  • 1. http://dd.dynamicdiagrams.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/orrery_2006.swf
  • 2. The others are complex communication/social skills, self-management, and systems thinking.

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