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The Romans and Trade


I The Romans and Trade IntroductionLandowners and TradersPRODUCTS OF THE ESTATE: A BROAD CONNOTATIONTHE LANDOWNER’S RANGE OF ACTIVITIESTHE SEPARATION BETWEEN PRODUCTION AND LONG-DISTANCE TRADINGSENATORS ENGAGED IN THE EXPORT BUSINESS?IDEOLOGICAL PROBLEMSTHE SECRECY THEORYFINANCING TRADE AND ITS CHANNELSAppointment of Slaves as Agents and the peculiumLendingCato Invents Collective LoansCONCLUSIONTraders’ FortunesSENECA AND CORNELIUS SENECIOTHOSE WHO ARE TRYING TO MAKE THEIR FORTUNE HONOURABLY, VIA TRADEBETWEEN PUTEOLI AND THE RED SEAP. Annius PlocamusCalpurnius Moschas and the CalpurniiC. Numidius Eros and rdios MowdriosC. PeticiusThe Most Lucrative RoutesThe AlabarchsPAINTED INSCRIPTIONS ON THE AMPHORAE FROM BAETICAFive Wrecks...and 486 tradersThe Decimi CaeciliiThe UrittiiThe Social Organization of Traders from BaeticaUnequal Appetites for HonoursThe Barbii from AquileiaThe Secundinii and the Igel MonumentURBAN FORTUNESDIVERSITY AND SPECIFICITYThe Matter of the MarketTHE ENORMOUS CONGLOMERATION OF INTERDEPENDENT MARKETS: A RED HERRINGDIVERGENT OPINIONSARCHAEOLOGICAL EVIDENCE AND ITS INTERPRETATIONOil from Baetica, Africa, and IstriaMODES OF TRANSPORTTHE INFLUENCE OF TRANSACTION COSTS: GROWING INEQUALITYPARADOXESThe Role of the StateLIMITS TO STATE PARTICIPATIONSUPPLYING THE ARMYSIDE EFFECTS OF FOOD-SUPPLY POLICYGrain Was a Giffen GoodOn the Usefulness of the Misuse of Public PropertyInfrastructure and Organization: The Example of LyonsDEMOGRAPHYCONCLUSIONMeeting NeedsII Scripta variaDreams of Wealth, Loans, and Seaborne TradeThe Sale of WineTHE POINT OF VIEW OF THE PRODUCERTHE POINT OF VIEW OF THE BUYERThe plebiscitum ClaudianumTHE PROHIBITION ON OWNING SEAGOING VESSELS WITH A CAPACITY GREATER THAN 300 AMPHORAEA TONNAGE DEEMED SUFFICIENT FOR TRANSPORTING ONE’S OWN PRODUCEQUAESTUS AND THE ORDERING OF THE PARTS OF THE PREAMBLEEVOLUTION OF THE PLEBISCITUM CLAUDIANUM: IN VERREM AND THE LEX IULIA DE REPETUNDISTHE IMPOSSIBLITY OF TENDERING FOR TAX GRAIN CONTRACTSQUAESTUS OMNIS PATRIBUS INDECORUS: THE THIRD CENTURYTALK AND ACTIONSPER INCERTA MARISRECAPITULATIONThe Crisis of ad 33ORIGINS AND DEVELOPMENTLAND PRICES AND INTEREST RATESTHE SENATUS CONSULTUM: TACITUS AND SUETONIUSTHE FORESEEABLE CONSEQUENCES AND THE PROBABLE OBJECTIVES OF THE SENATUS CONSULTUMWHAT LESSONS ARE TO BE DRAWN FROM THE CRISIS OF ad 33?Staple Provisions for Rome. Problems of QuantificationGRAINSources 1 and 2 in Approach A and Wastage during StorageOILWINECONCLUSIONFood Supplies for Rome. Coping with Geographical ConstraintsTHE ROMAN COUNTRYSIDE AND LONG-DISTANCE SUPPLIESTHE TIBERTHE SEAPORTSClaudius’ Edict and Ships of 10,000 modiiThe Dromedary of the Peticii and Trade with the EastWinds and Coins. Trade between the Roman Empire and IndiaUSING THE MONSOONNo One Discovered the MonsoonAn Unknown Pilot or Geographical Knowledge?New Maritime RoutesMASSIVE OUTFLOW OF MONEY?The TextsNumismatic DiscoveriesA Turning Point: The End of Augustus’ ReignVarious Systems of ExchangeAnd their Consequences in RomeD. Caecilius Hospitalis and M. Iulius Hermesianus (CIL VI. 1625b and 20742)D. CAECILIUS HOSPITALISINSCRIPTIONS ON AMPHORAE FROM MONTE TESTACCIO AND ON STONEM. IULIUS HERMESIANUS IN ROMECONCLUSIONDelivery of Oil from Baetica to the limes in Germania. Wierschowski versus RemesalWarehousing and Complementary Cargoes on the Alexandria Grain RunTHE GRAIN FROM ALEXANDRIA AND THE LENTILS OF C. NOVIUS EUNUS, A TRADER AT PUTEOLIMENELAUS, A CARIAN SHIP’S MASTER, AND BAETICAN AMPHORAE IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEANTHE LOW PRICE OF CRETAN WINE IN ROMECONCLUSIONWine Exporting and the Exception of GaulTRANSFORMATION OF DISTRIBUTION MAPS FOR THE EARLY SECOND CENTURY BCTHE GAULS AND WINE DURING THE LATE LA TENE PERIODBETWEEN CATO AND CAESAR, FROM GOLD TO SLAVESEFFECTS ON ITALIAN WINE-GROWING REGIONS: EXPANSION AND COLOURCREATION OF A SPECIALIZED MERCHANDISEThe Economic Crisis in Imperial Italy and Competition from the ProvincesITALIAN TERRA SIGILLATA POTTERYAMPHORAE AND VILLASThe Late RepublicThe First and Second Centuries ad
 
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