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Keep Records

You really need to remember to make good records of the date you call people, their numbers, and what they might have told you. If you don't find a job, you may be calling these people back in 30, 60, or 90 days. Many people will not respond to you positively for a month for two. You want to remind them that you need a job!

Most of the time it will take two or three reminders for people to really remember that you need a job. You could talk to them today about your need, and a week from now they become aware of a job opportunity and totally forget to associate it with you. After you've talked to them two or three times and reminded them of your need for a job, those kind of connections will be made. They will think, "Oh, yeah,_______ called me a couple of times and mentioned he needed a job ...I forgot!" So, keep good records, and don't hesitate to call people back.

A simple white sheet of paper with dates, names, phone numbers, and the place to record the results of your calls will be sufficient to keep records. Some people use a calendar so they know to call people back. Keep your records simple, but keep them.

What to Say

Previous Employers, Peers, Subordinates, and Acquaintances.

Name_______ Phone #_Date_

Date to call again_

Script: "Hello,_, this is_(your name)_, and I am presently looking for new job. We know each other from_. I am calling to ask if you might know of any job opportunities available either with a firm you work for or any others that you might know about. For the past_(period of time) I have been working at_(name of the company or what you have been doing)_. Can you think of anyone who might need what I can offer? long pause...

(If "no") then say: "I really appreciate your time. I'd like to send you my resume, and if you can think of anyone who might be interested, please pass it along to them. By the way, I'm not sure how long my search will take; I'd like to call you back in a month or so to see if you might have thought of anyone who might be interested. Would that be all right?"

Results_

Family

Name_______ Phone #_Date_

Date to call again_

Script: "Hello,_. This is_(your cousin, brother-in-law, etc.), and I am presently looking for a new job. I called to ask if you might know of any job opportunities that might be available. For the past_(period of time)

I've been working at_(name of company or what you been doing)_.

Can you think of anyone who might need what I can offer? long pause...

(If "no") then say: "I really appreciate your time. I'd like to send you my resume, and if you can think of anyone who might be interested, please pass it along to them. By the way, I'm not sure how long my search will take; I'd like to call you back in a month or so to see if you might have thought of anyone that might be interested. Would that be all right?"

Results_

The Internet

The Internet is tremendously popular for posting resumes. The last count I read, there were close to 65,000 different "job boards." The range of people that these job boards cater to is immense.

Posting your resume on a job board—any job board—can be risky. If you're presently employed, you certainly don't want to do it. No matter what anybody tells you, even though these sites are supposed to represent you confidentially, you can't afford to be "discovered" by your present employer. You're likely to be fired.

On top of that, you never know who might get a hold of your confidential information and how it might be used. We hear complaints all the time from people who say they're approached with scams because their resume was posted on the Internet. And to make matters even more interesting, your resume can "float" around in cyberspace long after you found a job. I personally had a candidate, who, six months after I had found her a job, was called in by her employer and asked if she was looking for a job. She was startled and after explaining that she wasn't, asked what led her employer to ask that question. Well, her resume was still floating around in cyberspace even though she had posted it eight months earlier. She had "removed" it from the primary job board where she had posted it, but some of the secondary job boards that pick up resumes from the primary boards still had it posted.

I know that if you need a job, you'll probably post a resume on the Internet. Even though it is popular, the nearest estimates that I found range anywhere from 2 to 6% of the people who post their resumes on the Internet find a job directly as a result of their posting. There is no way to verify these estimates. I read a source that stated that 90% of the people who post their resumes on the Internet never get a response. How can one measure that? The study had no documentation to it. Often professional recruiters will find potential candidates on the Internet. I'm not talking about that kind of "secondary" success. Of course, you don't care how you find a job, or who finds it for you. That's fair.

One of the primary reasons people post their resumes on the Internet is because it is an easy thing to do. But most of the time, it is one of those activities that is confused with productivity. It probably isn't going to get you very far except maybe for some come-ons and scams. The big mistake is to expect any kind of positive response, including an interview or even a job. Just don't expect very much from this effort.

How the Internet Can Help You

All of the above being said, there is no doubt that the Internet can help you look for a job. But it is going to require work in a different way than you might think: a very simple technique that will get you face-to-face interviews.

When you find a company that has posted a job on the Internet that you think you might fit, make a note of it. If you respond to the posting on the Internet and send a resume to most of the places the advertisement says to respond to, I guarantee you will be lost in cyberspace. Most organizations that post jobs on the Internet appoint some lower-level administrative person who really doesn't have any knowledge of the job being posted to review and to sort through the hordes of resumes they're going to receive. These "screeners" are instructed to look for certain things on a resume. If they don't recognize them, they will probably pass on the candidate. The probability of anyone's getting an interview with this process in place is very slim.

The wonderful thing about the Internet is that it is loaded with information—especially information about the companies you might want to interview with. So, if you find a posting for a job that fits the description of what you are looking for, go to the website of the company that has run the ad and research who would likely be a hiring authority for the job. Whatever you do, don't call and ask for the human resources department. That is going to be as productive as hitting the "send" button on your computer.

Call the company that you've chosen and ask for the person who would likely hire for the kind of position you would fill. I will discuss in a moment exactly what to say. This process is very simple. Think about it. If you are in customer service, you will call the customer service manager. If you work in accounting, call the accounting manager. The idea is to call a hiring authority with "pain"...the personal need to hire someone.

Frequently, the names of these people are actually on the website of the company itself. Also, many times their direct phone number is on the website, as well as their e-mail address. I recommend actually picking up the phone and calling the probable hiring authority. Don't send an e-mail or your resume without a phone call, or you will be wasting your time.

You can believe me now, or you can believe me later, but this is the only way to use the Internet effectively to help you find a job. Most people will e-mail their resume to a destination posted on the Internet then whine and moan that they never got a call to interview for a job that they fit absolutely "perfectly." Well, 434 other people are feeling exactly the same way. Pick up the phone and go to work!

 
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