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Contributors

Oleg A. Alimuradov is Professor of English and General Linguistics at Pyatigorsk State Linguistic University in Pyatigorsk, Russia. He specializes in discourse analysis, cognitive linguistics, semantics, English grammar and terminology. He has authored six books, including The Concept and Linguistics Semantics (2011) and numerous papers focusing on frame semantics, discursive strategies, concept modelling, the structure and processing of lexical meaning and metaphor. His new book dealing with the English-language nanotech terminology is currently in print.

Natalia S. Alimuradova graduated from Pyatigorsk State Linguistic University, Russia, and currently works as a translator in the area of scientific discourse. Her interests lie primarily in the sphere of discourse interpretation and mental process modelling. She has authored and coauthored several papers on cognitive modelling and discourse analysis.

Jan Chovanec is Assistant Professor of English Linguistics at Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic. He specializes in discourse analysis, stylistics and pragmatics, with a focus on media communication and legal discourse. He is co-author of Soudni preklad a tlumoceni [Court Translation and Interpreting] (2011) and author of numerous articles on discursive strategies in the British media. He is currently working on a book on the discourse of live text commentaries.

Olga Dontcheva-Navratilova is Assistant Professor of English Linguistics at Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic. Her main research interests lie in the area of discourse analysis, stylistics and pragmatics, at present with a focus on political and academic discourse.

She is the author of Analysing Genre: The Colony Text of UNESCO Resolutions (2009) and Coherence in Political Speeches (2011) and coeditor of Coherence and Cohesion in Spoken and Written Discourse (2009).

Renata Jancankova is Assistant Professor of English Linguistics at Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic. Her field of research is newspaper discourse and the British press with focus on crime news, the means expressing the status and identity of participants in newspaper reports and binary oppositions in crime reports. She has published articles on naming strategies in crime reports and means contributing to the effectiveness of news.

Maria A. Karatyshova is Assistant Professor of English Linguistics at Armavir State Teacher-Training Academy, Russia. She obtained a PhD in linguistics in 2010 and specializes in discourse analysis and metaphor creation and processing. She has co-authored a book on compliment discourse Krasota v Yazyke (Beauty in the Language) (2010) and several papers on the structure and pragmatics of compliment discourse.

Laszlo Imre Komlosi is Professor of Theoretical and English Linguistics and Communication Studies at the University of Pecs, Hungary, and at Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Slovakia. His research fields are linguistic pragmatics, philosophy of language, argumentation theory, cognitive linguistics and higher education management. He is vice rector at the University of Pecs, Hungary, responsible for academic affairs and international relations and a founding member of the Doctoral Schools in the fields of linguistics in Pecs and Nitra.

Andrei Levitsky is Professor of English Philology at the Kiev Taras Shevchenko National University, Ukraine. His research interests lie in the sphere of cognitive and communicative approaches to investigating word- stock and syntax of the West-Germanic (English and German) and the East-Slavic (Russian and Ukrainian) languages. He is the author of Comparative English and Ukrainian Grammar (2008) and Ethnic Designation through the Prism of Intercultural Communication (2011), and the editor of Comparative Typology of English, German, Russian and Ukrainian (2009) and Communication Strategies (2011).

Gabriela Missi'kova is Professor of English Linguistics at Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Slovakia, and she also teaches linguistic courses at Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Czech Republic. Her main research interests lie in stylistics and pragmatics, on which she has published widely. She is the author of Linguistic Stylistics (2003) and Analysing Translation as Text and Discourse (2007) and the editor-inchief of the journal Topics in Linguistics.

Alejandro Parini is Professor of English Linguistics at the University of Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina. He is also Director of the School of Languages and International Studies at the University of Belgrano and a Visiting Professor at City University, London. His main research interests focus on the sociopragmatic aspects of language in computer-mediated interaction. He is the author of Short Essays on Language (2002) and Lengua y Sociedad (2006) and co-editor of Escritura y Comunicacion (2009).

Renata Povolna is Associate Professor of English Linguistics at Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic. She specializes in discourse analysis, pragmatics and conversation analysis, currently focusing on academic discourse. She is the author of Spatial and Temporal Adverbials in English Authentic Face-to-Face Conversation (2003) and Interactive Discourse Markers in Spoken English (2010) and co-editor of Coherence and Cohesion in Spoken and Written Discourse (2009).

Renata Tomaskova is Assistant Professor of English Linguistics at the University of Ostrava, Czech Republic. In her research she focuses mainly on text linguistics, translation studies and stylistics. She has published articles on different genres in media discourse and style in fiction. She is the co-author of Communication Strategies in Text and Talk (2009) and Coherence and Cohesion in Spoken and Written Discourse (2009).

Henry Widdowson is Honorary Professor at the University of Vienna and Professor Emeritus at the University of London. His numerous books and articles in the field of applied linguistics and communicative language teaching have contributed decisively to the establishing of these fields and to the formation of their mode of inquiry. As the Applied Linguistics adviser to Oxford University Press, he was for many years the co-editor of Language Teaching: A Scheme for Teacher Education and the series editor of Oxford Introductions to Language Study. His most recent publications include Defining Issues in English Language Teaching (2003), Text, Context, Pretext (2004) and Discourse Analysis (2007).

 
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