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Bayonets and Locking Pins

Since we now routinely build our fuselages from SLS nylon, and because the build chambers in the machines available to us are of limited size, we often find it necessary to build up our fuselages from multiple SLS parts. This has naturally led us to develop bayonet joining systems that allow parts to be effectively and quickly linked. We have then made best use of this need to provide access to the interior of our airframes. The bayonets we use require a 60° twist to engage, and we then prevent them from undoing by the insertion of quick-release pins, see Figure 18.17.

We often also use quick-release locking pins to secure the wings on our aircraft to the fuselage, see Figure 18.18. Here the main boom slides into a mating hole in the fuselage, and the

Female and male bayonet produced in SLS nylon with quick-release locking pin

Figure 18.17 Female and male bayonet produced in SLS nylon with quick-release locking pin.

Quick-release pin fitting used to retain a wing to a fuselage (note lug on wing rib)

Figure 18.18 Quick-release pin fitting used to retain a wing to a fuselage (note lug on wing rib).

SLS nylon clamping mechanisms

Figure 18.19 SLS nylon clamping mechanisms.

two nylon lugs then locate in matching holes in the fuselage with one of the lugs being shaped to accept the retaining pin.

 
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