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Notes

  • 1. For more on the history of African literature see O.R. Dathorne, African Literature in the Twentieth Century. Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press, 1976 (Dathorne 1976); Charles Larson, The Novel in the Third World. Washington, DC: Inscape, 1976 (Larson 1976).
  • 2. Harry Garuba, “‘The Unbearable Lightness of Being’: Re-Figuring Trends in Recent Nigerian Poetry,” English in Africa. New Nigerian Writing, 32.1 (2005): 58 (Garuba 2005).
  • 3. Sefi Atta, Everything Good Will Come. Boston: Interlink Books, 2004 (Atta 2004).
  • 4. Sefi Atta, Swallow. Boston: Interlink Books, 2011 (Atta 2011).
  • 5. Cited in Lynn Hunt, Inventing Human Rights: A History. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2008, 15 (Hunt 2008).
  • 6. Hunt, Ibid., 16.
  • 7. Ibid., 18.
  • 8. Ibid., 28.
  • 9. Ibid., 29.
  • 10. Ibid., 32.
  • 11. Ayo Kehinde and Joy Ebong Mbipom, “Discovery, Assertion and SelfRealisation in Recent Nigerian Migrant Feminist Fiction: The Example of Sefi Atta’s Everything Good Will Come,” African Nebula, 3 (2011): 67 (Kehinde and Mbipom 2011).
  • 12. Jonas E. Akung, “Feminist Dimensions in Sefi Atta’s Everything Good Will Come,” Studies in Literature and Language 4.1 (2012): 114-122 Accessed October 10, 2012.(Akung 2012).
  • 13. Atta, Everything Good, 62 (Atta 2004).
  • 14. Emmanuel Levinas, Totality and Infinity. Alphonso Lingis, trans. (Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 1969), 194 (Levinas 1969).
  • 15. Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, WhiteMask. New York: Grove Press. 1967,109-111.
  • 16. Augustine H. Assah and Tobe Levin, “Images of Rape in African Fiction: Between the Assumed Fatality of Violence and the Cry for Justice,” Annales Aequatoria, 28 (2007): 333 (Assah and Levin 2007).
  • 17. Ibid., 336.
  • 18. Ibid., 62.
  • 19. Atta, Everything Good, 65 (Atta 2004).
  • 20. Unoma Azuah, “Of Phases and Faces: Unoma Azuah Engages Sefi Atta and Chika Unigwe,” Research in African Literature. Nigeria’s Third-Generation Novel: Preliminary Theoretical Engagement, 39.2 (2008): 112 (Azuah 2008).
  • 21. Ike Anya, “Sefi Atta: Something Good Comes to Nigerian Literature.” http://www.africanwriter.com/sefi-atta-something-good-comes-to-niger ian-literature/ (Accessed March 06, 2015).
  • 22. Atta, Everything Good, 76 (Atta 2004).
  • 23. Ibid., 157.
  • 24. Ibid., 251-252.
  • 25. Ibid., 246.
  • 26. Ibid., 180.
  • 27. Martin Buber, I and Thou. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1970, 58 (Buber 1970).
  • 28. Ibid., 60.
  • 29. Ibid., 62.
  • 30. Ibid., 59.
  • 31. Ibid., 62.
  • 32. Ibid., 228.
  • 33. Ibid., 228-229.
  • 34. Ibid., 321.
  • 35. Ibid., 131.
  • 36. Atta, Swallow, 47 (Atta 2011).
  • 37. Azuah, Ibid., 112 (Azuah 2008).
  • 38. Atta, Swallow, 46 (Atta 2011).
  • 39. Ibid., 95 (original italics).
  • 40. Larry Diamond, “Fiction as Political Thought,” African Affairs, 88.352 (1989): 435 (Diamond 1989).
  • 41. Atta, Swallow, 47 (Atta 2011).
  • 42. Ibid., 96.
  • 43. Ibid., 96.
  • 44. Ibid., 149.
  • 45. Audre Lorde, Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches. Freedom, CA: The Crossing Press, 1984, 54 (Lorde 1984).
  • 46. Ibid., 54.
  • 47. Ibid., 162.
  • 48. Atta, Everything Good, 259 (Atta 2004).
  • 49. Ibid., 326.
  • 50. Ibid., 330-331.
  • 51. Ibid., 256.
  • 52. Atta, Swallow, 290-295 (Atta 2011).
  • 53. Ibid., 45.
  • 54. See also J. Oloka-Onyango and Sylvia Tamale, “‘The Personal Is Political,’” or Why Women’s Rights Are Indeed Human Rights: An African Perspective on International Feminism. Human Rights Quarterly, 17.4 (1995): 691731 (Oloka-Onyango and Tamale 1995).
  • 55. Atta, Everything Good, 299 (Atta 2004).
 
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