Desktop version

Home arrow Education

  • Increase font
  • Decrease font


<<   CONTENTS   >>

Boza

Boza is a fermented beverage that is produced in Turkey and other Balkan countries (Kabak and Dobson, 2011). Its production starts with the boiling of a mixed flour of millet, rice, and wheat, and water (Kabak and Dobson, 2011). After filtering, the supernatant is inoculated with a part of a previous fermentation batch of boza, sourdough, or yoghurt (Altay et al., 2013; Kabak and Dobson, 2011). The mixture ferments at 30°C for 24 hours (Altay et al., 2013; Botes et al., 2007; Kabak and Dobson, 2011). The microbiota present during the fermentation can vary significantly, depending on the inoculum and region of production. Generally, a range of LAB is found during these fermentations, including Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc spp. (Altay et al., 2013; Botes et al., 2007; Kabak and Dobson, 2011). Several yeast species are found, but in contrast to other fermented cereal-based beverages, Saccharomyces spp. are not always present (Botes et al., 2007). Instead, Candida spp. and Pichia spp. can be the dominant yeasts in boza fermentation (Altay et al., 2013; Botes et al., 2007; Kabak and Dobson, 2011). Opportunistic pathogenic yeasts have been isolated from Bulgarian boza, highlighting the need for starter cultures (Botes et al., 2007). The shelf- life of boza is about 15 days and it is acceptable for consumption until the pH drops below 3.5 (Altay et al., 2013).

 
<<   CONTENTS   >>

Related topics