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CDC Vessel Sanitation Program 2011 Construction Guidelines

The guidelines are a framework for consistent construction and design that helps protect passengers and crew from spread of disease because of poor or inadequate physical facilities. It covers the facilities aboard ship that are related to public health including food, potable water storage and distribution, equipment placing and mounting, lighting, waste management, black and graywa- ter disposal systems, fire hose connections, cross-connections, heat exchangers, recreational water facilities; etc. (See endnote 25.)

United States Coast Guard Cruise Ship National Center of Expertise

(See endnote 21)

The United States Coast Guard is responsible for safety pertaining to passenger ships, both United States flagged and foreign, that come into US ports, and with special emphasis on large ships. Because of the continuing growth in the size, capacity, and complexity of cruise ships, the Coast Guard created the Cruise Ship National Center of Expertise in 2008 to provide highly proficient individuals who evaluate cruise ship safety and environmental security compliance. These individuals focus completely on foreign cruise ships and the Passenger Vessel Safety Program for foreign flagged ships. Consultation is given to the cruise industry on the construction and renovation of ships with environmental health officers doing plan reviews to analyze the ship’s design to help eliminate environmental health risks and to create situations where there will be a healthy and safe environment. Fire protection and detection systems are of prime concern. Environmental surveys are conducted aboard ship to determine if the waste stream of oil, non-hazardous material, hazardous material, and graywater which comes from sinks and showers, and black water which is sewage, is handled properly by highly trained crew members using appropriate equipment for storage, treatment, and disposal.

Interagency Marine Debris Coordinating Committee

This group co-chaired by the US EPA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration work to reduce the impact and source of marine debris of all types.

 
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