Desktop version

Home arrow Computer Science arrow Technological Entrepreneurship: Technology-Driven vs Market-Driven Innovation

Source

Isolutrols

The collaboration between Jim Broadbent, Professor Takuo Kosuge and RMIT group led to the commercial development of a dermaceutical, sodium scymnol sulphate, which has been marketed by McFarlane Pty. Ltd. as Isolutrols. The compound had originally been discovered by Professor Kosuge after hearing about fishermen off the Japanese coast who rubbed extracts of shark's liver on to their face to acquire clear, smooth skin. Research has also suggested properties in the compound that might help with some types of liver toxicity (Macrides et al. 1996).

Over a five-year period beginning in 1987, the RMIT team, in collaboration with Professor Kosuge, developed a method of extracting the compound from shark bile to 99.9 % level of purity (Dunlop and Barnetson 1995). Isolutrols is available as a spray lotion as a natural treatment of acne. However with sharks under threat in the wild, the extraction route from

(continued)

(continued)

shark bile for the manufacture of Isolutrols is not scalable. This outcome and the development problems encountered with Lyprinols reveals the significant scientific and technological problems associated with attempting to develop nutraceuticals from source organisms to the point where the chemistry is sufficiently understood to permit the creation of large-scale manufacturing operations. Hence given the potential problems associated with over-fishing, the only sustainable solution to support market demand is to extract the products from source organisms grown using aquaculture. This is an expensive solution and will limit significant market growth until an industrial-scale chemical synthesis technology can be developed (Hobbs 2002; Sipkema and Wijffels 2003).

 
Source
Found a mistake? Please highlight the word and press Shift + Enter  
< Prev   CONTENTS   Next >

Related topics