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Periphrastic do in Negative Statements

Another development of DO-periphrasis is its use in negative sentences, in other words one of the above-mentioned NICE qualities. As examples

  • (4.35)-(4.36) from Nurmi (1999a: 141-162) show for the indicative and (4.37)-(4.38) for the subjunctive, negative statements could be produced with or without resorting to periphrastic DO.
  • (4.35) Item I doe not meane to pase the lease of Redbourne unles I maie have (Nicholas Bacon, 1579; Bacon, II, 101)
  • (4.36) Item I meane not to pase eny assuraunce of landes or leases in generall wordes (Nicholas Bacon, 1579; Bacon, II, 101)
  • (4.37) if it take not effect according to your mynd (Otwell Johnson, 1546; Johnson, 795)
  • (4.38) if Mr. Cave do not like his prices, lett him sett either sorte at xij d more (Otwell Johnson, 1547; Johnson, 867)

Figure 4.11 shows the percentage of do counted from all negated sentences that could have had Do. Clauses with another auxiliary as well as the main verb be have been excluded as well as some other verbs that never appeared with do in the CEEC (for details, see Nurmi 1999a: 143).

As Figure 4.11 indicates, the development of negative DO-periphrasis occurs later than the affirmative: its growth begins only in the first half of the

Periphrastic do in negative statements. Percentage of do from negated sentences where do could be used. CEEC 1998 (based on Nurmi 1999a)

Figure 4.11. Periphrastic do in negative statements. Percentage of do from negated sentences where do could be used. CEEC 1998 (based on Nurmi 1999a).

sixteenth century. Its share does not increase to over 30 per cent until the middle of the seventeenth century.

 
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