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Notes

  • 1. Commons, 4 March 1946, Hansard, 420, cols 39-146.
  • 2. Wm. Roger Louis, Ends of British Imperialism: The Scramble for Empire, Suez and Decolonization (London, 2006), p. 480n136.
  • 3. Butler, Britain and the Empire, p. 115.
  • 4. Nicholas Tarling, Britain, Southeast Asia and the Onset of the Cold War, 1945-1950 (Cambridge, 1998), p. 317.
  • 5. Kent, British Imperial Strategy, p. 205.
  • 6. Ritchie Ovendale, ‘Britain, the United States, and the Cold War in SouthEast Asia, 1949-1950’, International Affairs, 58/3 (1982), p. 447.
  • 7. Tarling, Britain, Southeast Asia and the Onset ofthe Cold War, pp. 317-318.
  • 8. Steve Tsang, The Cold War’s Odd Couple: The Unintended Partnership between the Republic of China and the UK, 1950-1959 (London, 2006), pp. 59-60.
  • 9. Lanxin Xiang, ‘The Recognition Controversy: Anglo-American Relations in China, 1949’, Journal of Contemporary History, 27/2 (1992), pp. 340-341; Ritchie Ovendale, ‘Britain, the United States, and the Recognition of Communist China’, The Historical Journal (1983), p. 158.
  • 10. Wolf, ‘To Secure a Convenience’, pp. 301, 319-321.
  • 11. Colonial Office and Foreign Office, joint note, ‘Malaya: Attitude to be adopted in publicity towards Communism in Malaya and China’, undated, annex of: Foreign Office memorandum, ‘Anti-Communist propaganda in the Far East’, December 1949, CO537/5132, TNA.
  • 12. Ibid.
  • 13. Ovendale, ‘Britain, the United States, and the Recognition of Communist China’, pp. 152-153.
  • 14. Peter Lowe, Containing the Cold War in East Asia: British Policies towards Japan, China and Korea, 1948-53 (Manchester, 1997), p. 184.
  • 15. Ritchie Ovendale, ‘Britain and the Cold War in Asia’, in: Ritchie Ovendale (ed.), The Foreign Policy of the British Labour Governments, 1945-1951 (Leicester, 1984), p. 12.
  • 16. Cabinet conclusions, 27 June 1950, CAB128/17/39; Cabinet conclusions, 17 July 1950, CAB128/18/6; Cabinet conclusions, 4 September 1950, CAB128/18/15; Nicholas Tarling, ‘Britain and the Cold War in Southeast Asia’, in: Albert Lau (ed.), Southeast Asia and the Cold War (London, 2012), p. 16; Tsang, A Modern History of Hong Kong, p. 157.
  • 17. Cabinet conclusions, 27 June 1950, CAB128/17/39.
  • 18. Steven Casey, Selling the Korean War: Propaganda, Politics, and Public Opinion 1950-1953 (Oxford, 2008), p. 27.
  • 19. Cabinet conclusions, 29 November 1950, CAB128/18/38.
  • 20. Mark Chi-kwan, ‘American “China Hands” in the 1950s’, in: Cindy Yik-yi Chu (ed.), Foreign Communities in Hong Kong, 1840s-1950s (New York, 2005), p. 179.
  • 21. James T. H. Tang, ‘World War to Cold War: Hong Kong’s Future and Anglo- Chinese Interactions’, in: Ming K. Chan (ed.), Precarious Balance: Hong Kong Between China and Britain, 1842-1992 (Hong Kong, 1994), p. 122.
  • 22. MacDonald to Foreign Office, 8 December 1952, 18/5/18, Malcolm MacDonald papers, Durham University Library: Archives and Special Collections.
  • 23. Carroll, A Concise History, p. 141.
  • 24. Tsang, A Modern History, p. 164.
  • 25. Mark, ‘American “China Hands” in the 1950s’, p. 179.
  • 26. Chu, Chinese Communists and Hong Kong Capitalists, p. 46; Catherine R. Schenk, ‘Hong Kong’s Economic Relations with China 1949-1955: Blockade, Embargo and Financial Controls’, in: Lee Pui-tak (ed.), Colonial Hong Kong and Modern China: Interaction and Reintegration (Hong Kong, 2005), p. 214.
  • 27. Creech Jones, circular dispatch to the colonies, ‘Powers for Dealing with Subversive Activities’, 18 February 1950, CO537/5389, TNA.
  • 28. Jbid.
  • 29. Jbid.
  • 30. Jbid.
  • 31. Stuart Ball, The Conservative Party and British Politics, 1902-1951 (London, 2013), p. 115.
  • 32. Malcolm Pearce and Geoffrey Stewart, British Political History, 1867-2001: Democracy and Decline (London, 2002), pp. 452-453.
  • 33. Klaus Larres, Churchill’s Cold War: The Politics of Personal Diplomacy (London, 2002), p. 139.
  • 34. Heinlein, British Government Policy, p. 88.
  • 35. Saki Dockrill, Britain’s Retreat from East of Suez: The Choice between Europe and the World? (Basingstoke, 2002), p. 16; Peden, Arms, Economics and British Strategy, p. 272.
  • 36. Cabinet conclusions, 1 November 1951, CAB128/23/2.
  • 37. Geoffrey K. Fry, The Politics ofDecline: An Interpretation of British Politics from the 1940s to the 1970s (Basingstoke, 2005), pp. 120-123; Kocho- Williams, Russia’s International Relations, p. 104.
  • 38. L. J. Butler, Britain and the Empire: Adjusting to a Post-Imperial World (London, 2002), p. 113.
  • 39. Sarah Stockwell and L. J. Butler, ‘Introduction’, in: L. J. Butler and Sarah Stockwell (eds), The Wind of Change: Harold Macmillan and British Decolonization (Basingstoke, 2013), p. 5.
  • 40. S. R. Ashton, ‘Keeping Change within Bounds: A Whitehall Reassessment’, in: Martin Lynn (ed.), The British Empire in the 1950s: R.etreat or R.evival? (Basingstoke, 2006), pp. 32-33.
  • 41. Commons, 14 November 1951, Hansard, 493, col. 984.
  • 42. Ashton, ‘Keeping Change within Bounds’, p. 33.
  • 43. Heinlein, British Government Policy, pp. 87-88, 90.
  • 44. Ibid., p. 90.
  • 45. Larres, Churchill’s Cold War, pp. 371-372.
  • 46. Cabinet conclusions, 20 October 1955, CAB128/29/36.
  • 47. Stockwell and Butler, ‘Introduction’, p. 5.
  • 48. Terrence R. Guay, The United States and the European Union: The Political Economy ofa Relationship (London, 2012), pp. 26-27; Larres, ‘Britain and the Cold War’, p. 153.

CHAPTER 11

 
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